BIGCAPITAL's Blog

February 23, 2011

Inflation Building, Fed Should Back Off: LaVorgna

Filed under: Uncategorized — bigcapital @ 12:22 am
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Inflation Building, Fed Should Back Off: LaVorgna

As government economists and Fed apologists continue to dismiss inflation pressures, the fear that easy money and commodity pressures are about to come home to roost is building.

While Michael Pento at Euro Pacific Capital and a handful of others have been pounding the table about inflation ever since the Federal Reserve began quantitative easing, the sentiment is beginning to spread.

The latest on board is Joe LaVorgna, chief US economist at Deutsche Bank, who warns in a note sent to clients Friday that “inflation pressures are inflating.”

The threat is two-pronged: On one hand this week’s producer and consumer price numbers show pressures are building in the crude, or initial, price pipeline that will spread to intermediate and finished products in the months ahead.

On the other hand is “energy inflation contagion,” in which surging prices in that space “have shown a significant capacity to breed inflation contagion among related categories and have destabilized inflation expectations.”

Taking both threats into consideration, LaVorgna posits that the Fed should reconsider completing the entire $600 billion of Treasury buys it has planned for the second leg of QE.

Unless the brakes are put on, LaVorgna argues that core finished PPI prices will increase at an annualized 4 percent rate, and he concedes that if his calculations are wrong they are on the low side.

Finally, he warns against the pervasive mindset that commodity price increases will not cause so-called “pass-through” costs into the broader economy. The rise in CPI and PPI comes as manufacturing activity and capacity are rising, as opposed to the last bout of commodity-induced inflation when the economy was shrinking.

An excerpt from the LaVorgna note:

“We believe the rise in commodity prices is significant, because it is occurring alongside robust factory activity and a general strengthening in underlying domestic demand—a crucial difference from the 2008 run-up in commodities, when the factory sector was shrinking and demand was slowing. Therefore, monetary policymakers should be cognizant of the pipeline pressure brewing in the PPI.

“The risk is that an overstay of aggressively accommodative monetary policy could lead to even larger gains in retail goods prices down the road—the Catch 22 of Fed folks worried that higher commodities will crimp demand. Rather it is ample demand that is pushing commodities higher. Consequently, as long as monetary policy remains extraordinarily accommodative, thereby further boosting demand, we expect these trends to persist if not become more durable.”

.

Dollar May Appreciate to 1.0067 Swiss Francs

Dollar May Appreciate to 1.0067 Swiss Francs: Technical Analysis

The dollar may reverse last week’s decline and rally 6 percent to its December high against the Swiss franc, Commerzbank AG said, citing technical indicators.

“Longer-term, we target 1.0067” Swiss francs per dollar, Karen Jones, head of fixed-income, commodity and currency technical analysis at Commerzbank in London, wrote in a report today. The exchange rate reached that level on Dec. 1.

The dollar strengthened 0.3 percent to 94.78 Swiss centimes at 12:30 p.m. today in London. The greenback slumped almost 3 percent against the franc last week and sank to 94.25 earlier today, the weakest level since Feb. 3, Bloomberg data show.

“We would allow the slide to continue to 0.9425, from where we would favor recovery,” Jones wrote. That’s the 78.6 percent Fibonacci retracement of the rally seen in February, Jones wrote.

The dollar may test resistance at around 97.74 centimes, she said. Those levels represent the 61.8 percent Fibonacci retracement of the move down from December and the high from Jan. 11, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Fibonacci analysis is based on the theory that prices rise or fall by certain percentages after reaching a high or low. Resistance and support levels are areas on a chart where technical analysts anticipate orders to sell or buy, respectively, a currency and its related instruments

Fed’s Fisher Says More Stimulus Unnecessary

Fed’s Fisher Says More Stimulus Unnecessary

(RTTNews) – A top Federal Reserve official declared on Thursday that we would not back more monetary easing when the Fed’s $600 billion quantitative easing program winds to a close.

Richard Fisher, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, was quoted as saying that he could not foresee any circumstances that would warrant more stimulus and suggested that the central bank should turn its attention to unwinding support.

Fisher’s comments contrast with those made by the Chicago Fed President Charles Evans, who backed the Fed’s extremely loose monetary policy and assured that it had the tools to tighten quickly if needed should inflation rise faster than expected

February 14, 2011

U.K Inflation fears lead investors to bet on rate rises

Filed under: Uncategorized — bigcapital @ 8:36 am
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

U.K Inflation fears lead investors to bet on rate rises

http://marketpin.blogspot.com/

Published: February 13 2011 18:54 | Last updated: February 13 2011 18:54 – The Financial Times

LONDON – Hundreds of billions of dollars have exchanged hands this year in bets on when the next interest rate rises will be in the UK and eurozone, as volumes have surged in these markets because of the growing threat of inflation.

Financial markets are betting that the UK will be the first to raise rates in June, followed by the European Central Bank in September and finally the US Federal Reserve in December.

Rising food and commodity prices have prompted markets to bring forward expectations of rate rises, sparking the jump in volumes as inflation has become one of the biggest concerns for businesses, consumers and investors.

The increasing focus on inflation has also triggered a debate over the accuracy of these predictions, with opinions divided over how much faith investors should place in them.

Don Smith, economist at Icap, said: “The market forecasts are as good a guide as you will get. They are in a sense multibillion-dollar predictions because of the vast amount of money behind the trades that set them.”

Some strategists also argue that rate forecasts can be self-fulfilling, as central banks do not like to surprise markets.

However, John Wraith, fixed-income strategist at BofA Merrill Lynch, said: “Market rate expectations are useful indicators, but they only tell you the consensus market view at any given point in time. Circumstances change and so do they.”

Mr Wraith thinks rates in the UK, for example, may be delayed beyond June, as policymakers are more concerned about weak growth in spite of rising inflation, which at 3.7 per cent is nearly double the Bank of England’s inflation target. There is also a view that rises in fixed-interest mortgage rates and some company loan costs are in effect tightening monetary policy for the Bank of England, which means that rates may not have to be increased as early as the market expects.

However, most strategists say the markets are more accurate today than they were in the past, as the contracts – known as overnight index swaps in the UK and eurozone and Fed funds futures in the US – used to make the predictions are more widely traded with hundreds of banks and investment funds making bets.

Brokers say rough estimates show daily turnover has risen to about $200bn in Fed funds futures and to about $20bn in each of the UK and eurozone overnight index swap markets

December 31, 2010

Goldman Sachs Boosts Global Growth Forecasts 2011

 

Goldman Sachs Boosts Global Growth Forecasts 2011

 Economists at Goldman Sachs Group Inc., the most profitable Wall Street firm, increased their forecasts for U.S. and global growth in 2011, predicted an acceleration in 2012 and recommended investors buy banks.

 The U.S. economy will grow at a 2.7 percent rate next year, up from a previous forecast of 2 percent, and 3.6 percent in 2012, economists led by Jan Hatzius in New York said in a report today. The global economy will grow 4.6 percent in 2011 and 4.8 percent in 2012, Dominic Wilson, senior global economist, said in a separate report.

 They recommended U.S. bank stocks, junk bonds, commodities, Japanese stocks and China’s currency as the first of the firm’s “top trades” for 2011. The forecasts are a departure from the pessimism that characterized Goldman Sachs’ projections since 2006.

 “This outlook represents a fundamental shift in the thinking that has governed our forecast for at least the last five years,” Hatzius said in the report. “The hand-off from policy stimulus to private demand — which seemed elusive just a couple of months ago — now appears to be developing.”

 U.S. stocks started what is historically their best month with a rally today after ADP Employer Services data showed companies added 93,000 jobs last month, the Federal Reserve said the economy gained strength across most of the nation and manufacturing in China expanded at the fastest pace in seven months. The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index advanced as much as 2.3 percent, the most since Sept. 1.

 Underlying Demand

 The Goldman Sachs economists said underlying demand, a measure of growth that excludes the effects of fiscal stimulus and inventory restocking, has strengthened and is on track to expand at a 5 percent rate in the fourth quarter.

 On average, economists surveyed by Bloomberg expect the U.S. economy to grow 2.5 percent next year and 3.1 percent in 2012. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development lowered its forecast for global growth last month to 4.2 percent for 2011 from 4.5 percent, and predicted 4.6 percent for 2012.

 Even as growth accelerates, U.S. unemployment will remain elevated by historical standards, declining to 8.5 percent by the end of 2012 from 9.6 percent in October, the economists said. The jobless rate increased to 10.1 percent in October 2009, the highest monthly figure since 1983.

 Inflation, Unemployment

 Core inflation, which excludes food and energy prices, is likely to be 0.5 percent in each of the next two years, Goldman Sachs said. The combination of high unemployment and low inflation is likely to keep the Federal Reserve from raising interest rates, the economists said.

 Conditions will be “positive for risky assets,” they wrote. The S&P 500, the main benchmark for American equities, will likely end next year at 1,450, up 20 percent from 1,206.07 at 4 p.m. in New York.

 The S&P 500 has gained 8.2 percent this year and recouped three-fifths of its decline from a record in October 2007. Concerns about the economic fallout from government debt reduction by some European countries caused rallies to stall in April and November and are the principal risk to Goldman’s outlook, the economists said.

 Growth in emerging markets may slow next year as acceleration in the U.S. prompts China, other Asian economies and Brazil to tighten monetary policy, the economists said.

 For its top trades, Goldman recommended betting on a decline in the value of the U.S. dollar against the Chinese renminbi via two-year non-deliverable forwards for an expected return of 6 percent.

 Bets on the KBW Bank Index will return 25 percent, and selling protection on high-yield corporate bonds via credit- default swaps will return 8.7 percent, they predicted.

 Japan’s Nikkei 225 Stock Average is likely to return 20 percent next year, while a basket of crude oil, copper, cotton, soybeans and platinum will gain 28 percent, they said.

November 19, 2010

More rate rises on the cards, says OECD

More rate rises on the cards, says OECD

* Australia’s recovery ‘will need further rate rises’
* ‘Mining boom is fuelling economic recovery’
* OECD report forecasts economic growth

AUSTRALIA’S strong recovery from the global economic downturn, fuelled by the mining boom, means the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) will have to continue to raise its official cash rate, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) says.

The OECD also said the global recovery has become more hesitant, but low interest rates in many countries suggest this “soft patch” is unlikely to persist for too long.

In its semi-annual Economic Outlook report, released overnight, the OECD said Australia’s projected growth was likely to require a further tightening of monetary conditions to ensure that a non-inflationary recovery remained on track.

The OECD is forecasting Australian economic growth at 3.6 per cent in 2011 and 4.0 per cent in 2012, after 3.3 per cent in 2010.

“OECD projections include further tightening of monetary policy to moderate demand pressures and rein in the level of inflation, which is relatively high at the beginning of the cycle,” the Paris-based institution said

The RBA’s increase in the cash rate this month to 4.75 per cent was the seventh rise since October 2009.

The OECD expects inflation to remain near the top of end the RBA’s two to three per cent target band – 2.8 per cent in 2011 and 2.9 per cent in 2012.

More broadly among the 33 OECD countries, growth is forecast to expand by 2.3 per cent next year and 2.8 per cent in 2012, with inflation at a subdued 1.5 per cent and 1.4 per cent, respectively.

“The global recovery is continuing to recover, but progress has become more hesitant,” the think tank said.

“With monetary policies remaining accommodative even as fiscal consolidation becomes widespread, the present soft patch in output growth is not projected to persist for long.”

Australia’s unemployment rate is expected to fall below five per cent after mid-2011 and to 4.7 per cent in 2012, compared with 5.4 per cent as of October this year.

This is well below the expected OECD average of 8.1 per cent next year and 7.5 per cent the following year

The OECD said increased business investment should be the main engine room of Australian economic growth.

“The strength of demand from major Asian countries and the terms of trade will favour the mining sector, whose expansion should have a knock-on effect on the rest of the economy,” the OECD said.

“These developments will probably compensate for weaker (government) demand and stimulate job creation, which should support household incomes and consumption.”

The OECD said this positive outlook, associated with the development of China, could boost confidence and produce even stronger than expected growth in domestic demand.

“However, this scenario might also be adversely affected by renewed financial turbulence in the OECD area or by an unexpected slowdown in the Chinese economy,” it said.

As in a more in-depth analysis of Australia by the OECD released last Sunday, the latest report urged reforms in the housing and infrastructure sectors to reduce bottlenecks that the mining boom was likely to exacerbate

SOURCE: http://www.news.com.au/business/

Blog at WordPress.com.